Newsletters
The Enterprise Security Supersite NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
This ad will display for the next 20 seconds. Please click for more information, or scroll down to pass the ad, or Close Ad.
Home Network Security Viruses & Malware Hackers Security Solutions More Topics...
Vblock™ Systems:
Advanced converged infrastructure
increases productivity & lowers costs.

www.vce.com
Network Security
24/7/365 Network Uptime!
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
Germany Fines Google Just $189,230 for Privacy Violation
Germany Fines Google Just $189,230 for Privacy Violation

By Jennifer LeClaire
April 22, 2013 10:43AM

Bookmark and Share
Analyst Greg Sterling said the fine was insignificant, even trivial, for Google. "It's more of a PR problem than anything," he said. "What's more interesting is the talk of substantially increasing financial penalties for privacy violations. For big Internet companies, penalties that are below at least a $1 million threshold won't be noticed."
 


Google has been fined $189,230 by a German regulator for collecting wireless network data via its Street View service. The Hamburg commissioner for Data Protection and Freedom of Information cited Google with illegal recording of Wi-Fi networks. Google has so far been quiet about the fine.

From 2008 to 2010, the commissioner said, the search engine giant simultaneously took photographs of streets and houses and captured wireless networks within range of the vehicles it used in the process. Google admitted that it recorded content data of unencrypted Wi-Fi connections during the course of its documentation during a commission inquiry.

What exactly did the company capture that has the commission up in arms? According to the Hamburg investigation, Google grabbed large quantities of personal data, including e-mails, passwords, photos and chat protocols.

Germany Wants Higher Fines

"In my estimation this is one of the most serious cases of violation of data protection regulations that have come to light so far. Google did cooperate in the clarification thereof and publicly admitted having behaved incorrectly," said Johannes Caspar, the Hamburg commissioner for Data Protection and Freedom of Information.

"It had never been the intention to store personal data, Google said. But the fact that this nevertheless happened over such a long period of time and to the wide extent established by us allows only one conclusion: that the company internal control mechanisms failed seriously."

The commission has notified Google of the fine and instructed the search engine giant to delete the illegally captured data. According to Hamburg, Google already has complied. Caspar said as long as violations of data protection laws are punishable by discount rates, the enforcement of data protection laws in a digital world with its high potential for abuse will be all but impossible.

"The regulation currently being discussed in the context of the future European General Data Protection Regulation, whereby a maximum fine of 2 percent of a company's annual turnover is provided for, would, on the other hand, enable violations of data protection laws to be punished in a manner that would be felt economically," he said.

Google's PR Problem

Greg Sterling, principal analyst at Sterling Market Intelligence, said the $189,230 fine is insignificant, even trivial, for Google.

"It's more of a PR problem than anything. What's more interesting is the talk of substantially increasing financial penalties for privacy violations. For big Internet companies, penalties that are below at least a $1 million threshold won't be noticed," Sterling said.

"This also reflects the ongoing differences between U.S.-based Internet companies and the much more strict European attitude toward privacy. We'll continue to see that tension play out over the coming several years, undoubtedly with more fines to come."
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:

mecuetksk:

Posted: 2013-04-22 @ 11:43am PT
Very interesting story.



Your Next Generation Data Center Is Here! Vblock™ Systems: the world's most advanced converged infrastructure are built on the Cisco Unified Computing System with Intel® Xeon® processors. Vblock™ Systems deliver extraordinary time to market, ROI and TCO, and flexibility to meet your continually changing demands with 5X faster deployment, 96% less downtime, and 1/2 the cost. Click here to learn more.


 Network Security
1.   Lessons from Verizon's Threat Report
2.   Verizon Report Exposes Cyberthreats
3.   How Are Web Sites Post-Heartbleed?
4.   White House Updating Privacy Policy
5.   Target Hackers May Be Tough To Find


advertisement
How Are Web Sites Post-Heartbleed?
Questions on open source, security.
Average Rating:
Heartbleed Exploit Could Cost Millions
But it could have been prevented.
Average Rating:
Michaels: Nearly 3M Cards Breached
But the hack has been contained.
Average Rating:
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
What Verizon's Data Breach Report Can Teach Enterprises
It’s probably not a jaw-dropper, but cyberespionage is officially on the rise. And the use of stolen or misused credentials is still the leading way the bad guys gain access to corporate information.
 
Top Cyberthreats Exposed by Verizon Report
Beyond Heartbleed, there are cyberthreats vying to take down enterprise networks, corrupt smartphones, and wreak havoc on businesses. Verizon is exposing these threats in a new report.
 
Where Do Web Sites Stand, Post-Heartbleed?
A security firm says the vast majority of Web sites have patched themselves to protect against the Heartbleed bug, but now there are questions raised on the reliability of open-source programs.
 

Navigation
Enterprise Security Today
Home/Top News | Network Security | Viruses & Malware | Hackers | Security Solutions | Mobile Security | Disaster Recovery | Windows Security
Data Security | EST Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters | XML/RSS Feed

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.