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THE ENTERPRISE SECURITY SUPERSITE. UPDATED 6 MINUTES AGO.
You are here: Home / Viruses & Malware / Bitcoin Row: Will Industry Implode?
Bitcoin Dispute: Will Digital Currency Implode?
Bitcoin Dispute: Will Digital Currency Implode?
By Ryan Nakashima Like this on Facebook Tweet this Link thison Linkedin Link this on Google Plus
PUBLISHED:
JULY
17
2017
Got some bitcoin? An internal dispute over the digital currency could soon mean financial losses, whipsawing prices and delays in processing payments.

It's also possible that nothing much changes. It all depends on whether the people who maintain bitcoin can agree by July 31 to implement a major software upgrade -- one designed to improve capacity on the increasingly clogged network.

Not everyone is on board. In particular, some bitcoin "miners," who are rewarded for verifying transactions, aren't supporting the changes. Any split between miners and others who use bitcoin, including a number of startups and a few big companies, could cause a panic in the $39 billion bitcoin marketplace.

So far, bitcoin's value in U.S. dollars has soared amid the uncertainty. It's currently at about $2,300, more than triple what it was a year ago. But bitcoin is notoriously volatile; because the price spiked so rapidly, it also fell quickly, and bitcoin has lost about a quarter of its value since its peak in June at above $3,000.

Here's a look at the current dispute.

What Is Bitcoin, Again?

Bitcoin is a digital currency that's not tied to any bank or government . Like cash, it lets users spend or receive money anonymously, or mostly so; like other online payment services, it also lets them do so over the internet.

The coins are created by computer farms that "mine" them and verify other users' transactions by solving complex mathematical puzzles. Miners receive bitcoin in exchange. It's also possible to exchange bitcoin for U.S. dollars and other currencies.

Bitcoin has been touted as a currency of the future, but so far it hasn't proven very popular as a way to pay for goods or services.

What's Behind the Fuss?

In a word, speed.

The bitcoin network is limited in how quickly it can shuffle around digital money. As bitcoin has grown, payment delays have become more common and worrisome.

Some software developers came up with a new way to speed things up by reengineering bitcoin's universal ledger, a file called the blockchain. Supporters of the new method include Microsoft, the bitcoin exchange Coinbase and a variety of other bitcoin proponents who would like to see the currency used more widely in commerce.

But this bitcoin software update doesn't have unanimous support.

What Happens on July 31?

The reformers say they've run out of patience and have set a deadline for moving to the new system.

At 8 p.m. Eastern time on July 31, they're threatening to stop recognizing transactions confirmed by miners who haven't adopted the upgrade. That would create enormous uncertainty in the bitcoin economy, as no one could really know if the bitcoin they'd just paid (or received) was actually moving through the system the way it's supposed to.

Some big bitcoin miners -- like Chinese bitcoin mining equipment giant Bitmain -- haven't signaled support for the new system. A rift could result in two or even more incompatible versions of bitcoin.

What Would That Mean?

Generally speaking, chaos -- though mostly limited to those who use or squirrel away bitcoin. No one using bitcoin could be sure which version they held, or what might happen if they spent it or accepted bitcoin as payment.

Taking bitcoin, for instance, could leave you with currency you couldn't spend freely -- and that might disappear entirely if it ended up being the "wrong" kind.

That's one reason the community-supported website Bitcoin.org warned users Wednesday not to accept any bitcoin up to two days prior to the deadline and to wait for confirmation the situation had been resolved before trading again.

"It's a rather awful situation," David Harding, who posted the warning for Bitcoin.org, said in an email.

What's Behind This Fight?

Money, of course. Some companies that pool miners together believe the new system could result in lower transaction fees, cutting into their profits. At the same time, the reformers foresee new business opportunities in a faster, more reliable form of bitcoin.

Samson Mow, chief strategy officer at blockchain developer Blockstream, said the looming showdown has been propelled by bitcoin users frustrated at having a "simple bug fix" blocked by miners out for profit.

"People are fed up," he said. "The users are taking back their voice."

© 2017 Associated Press under contract with NewsEdge/Acquire Media. All rights reserved.

Image credit: iStock/Artist's concept.

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