HOME     MENU     SEARCH     NEWSLETTER    
THE ENTERPRISE SECURITY SUPERSITE. UPDATED 14 MINUTES AGO.
You are here: Home / Viruses & Malware / Twitter Messages Link to Malware
Some Twitter Direct Messages Link to Malware
Some Twitter Direct Messages Link to Malware
By Jennifer LeClaire / Enterprise Security Today Like this on Facebook Tweet this Link thison Linkedin Link this on Google Plus
PUBLISHED:
SEPTEMBER
25
2012


Be careful when you open that Twitter Direct Message suggesting you've been caught in a Facebook video. It could contain links to a nasty surprise in the form of malware.

Specifically, one of the messages says, "your in this" and has a link to a Facebook video. Another message that works to accomplish the same goal says, "you even see him taping you...that's awful" with a link to the video.

"Users who click on the link are greeted with what appears to be a video player and a warning message that 'An update to Youtube player is needed.' The Web page continues to claim that it will install an update to Flash Player 10.1 onto your computer," said Graham Cluley, a senior security analyst at Sophos.

Where's the Compromise?

Cluley said potential victims are invited to download a program called FlashPlayerV10.1.57.108.exe. He described it as a backdoor Trojan that can also copy itself to accessible drives and network shares.

"Quite how users' Twitter accounts became compromised to send the malicious DMs in the first place isn't clear, but the attack underlines the importance of not automatically clicking on a link just because it appeared to be sent to you by a trusted friend," Cluley said.

"If you do find that it was your Twitter account sending out the messages, the sensible course of action is to assume the worst, change your password -- make sure it is something unique, hard-to-guess and hard-to-crack -- and revoke permissions of any suspicious applications that have access to your account."

Trust Issues

Rob Enderle, principal analyst at the Enderle Group, said the issue boils down to trust.

"What happens is you get a note from somebody that you trust and you believe the note is from them. Often since you are using Twitter and you are multitasking, you click on it before you fully realize that it is likely malware. The damage, of course, is already done," Enderle told us.

Even though he knows better, Enderle admits that he sometimes clicks links he shouldn't. His security programs tend to catch the malware and rid his computer of it. His advice: If you get a message from a company that should know you and it opens with a formal greeting without your name, don't read it because chances are it's malware.

"The malware writers are social engineering," he said. "They recognize that we are all pressed with many things and we are conditioned to trust certain people. If we see something questionable from somebody we trust, we are still likely to trust it, particularly if we are multitasking."

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:

Like Us on FacebookFollow Us on Twitter
TOP STORIES NOW
MAY INTEREST YOU
High Quality CRM Data: Prevent, detect and fix errors at the point of data entry for Dynamics CRM. Trillium Software helps you achieve an accurate, synchronized, single view of customers. It's time to trust your data. Take a product tour and read CRM Analyst opinions here.
MORE IN VIRUSES & MALWARE
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

NETWORK SECURITY SPOTLIGHT
Using Internet-connected devices without strong passwords is inherently risky, as illustrated by reports that a Russian Web site is showing live footage from thousands of people's webcams.

ENTERPRISE HARDWARE SPOTLIGHT
Doctor Who had K-9, the robot dog that accompanied him on adventures through space. Now, Mountain View has K5, a 5-foot-tall, 300-pound robot security guard patrolling in the Bay Area.

MOBILE TECHNOLOGY SPOTLIGHT
To better its customer service, Comcast is pulling out at least some of the stops. The cable giant has launched an app so you can track the cable guy in real time. It's designed to ease customer frustration.

© Copyright 2014 NewsFactor Network, Inc. All rights reserved. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.