Newsletters
The Enterprise Security Supersite NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
This ad will display for the next 20 seconds. Click for more information, or
Home Network Security Viruses & Malware Cybercrime Security Solutions More Topics...
Eliminate costly downtime!
Find out how with Free White Paper
& enter to win a Samsung Galaxy Note

www.apc.com
Enterprise Software
Tame your scariest paperwork. Find Out How
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
Google Ups Ante for Chrome Bug Hunters
Google Ups Ante for Chrome Bug Hunters

By Jennifer LeClaire
August 17, 2012 9:20AM

Bookmark and Share
Google isn't stopping with Chrome. The Chromium Vulnerability Rewards Program continues to cover vulnerabilities in Adobe Flash as well as other well-known software such as the Linux kernel, various open-source libraries and daemons, X windows, and so on.
 


Bugs are an unpleasant fact of life for browser-makers -- but Google is proving just how serious it is about getting to the root of them. Google on Thursday launched a new Chromium Vulnerability Rewards Program to encourage bug hunters to report open doors in its open source browser.

With the new program, Google is essentially upping the ante for security researchers who invest their time to make Chromium more secure. Google so far has paid out more than $1 million in rewards to security researchers but software engineer Chris Evans said there's been a drop off in reports recently.

"This signals to us that bugs are becoming harder to find, as the efforts of the wider community have made Chromium significantly stronger," Evans wrote in a blog post. Google figures harder-to-find bugs demand higher-than-usual rewards and is responding accordingly.

Big Bounty Bonuses

Under the new Chromium Vulnerability Rewards Program paradigm, Google is adding a bonus of $1,000 or more on top of the base reward for what it calls "particularly exploitable" issues.

"The onus is on the reporter to provide a quick demonstration as part of the repro," Evans explained. "For example, for a DOM-based use-after-free, one might use JavaScript to allocate a specific object type in the 'freed' slot, resulting in a vtable dereference of 0x41414141."

Google is also adding a bonus of $1,000 or more on top of the base reward for bugs in stable areas of the code base. By "stable," Evans said, Google means that the defect rate appears to be low. Google is also adding a bonus of $1,000 or more on top of the base reward for serious bugs that impact a significantly wider range of products beyond Chromium.

What does Google mean by over "$1,000 or more on top of the base reward"? Google can decide that on a case-by-case basis. Some rewards have reached as high as $10,000.

Beyond Google Chrome

But Google isn't stopping with Chrome. The Chromium Vulnerability Rewards Program continues to cover vulnerabilities in Adobe Flash as well as other well-known software such as the Linux kernel, various open-source libraries and daemons, X windows, and so on.

We caught up with Greg Sterling to get his take on the changes Google is making to its Chromium Vulnerability Rewards Program. He told us this move highlights Google's obvious interest in identifying and fixing security flaws.

"Crowd sourcing that function, as many companies are doing, is very smart and more effective than leaving it up to an internal team," Sterling said. "By raising the bounties it pays it will get more attention and time from hackers and others. There's a competitive market for their time and Google is competing with others."
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:





 Enterprise Software
1.   Salesforce App Personalizes the Sale
2.   HP Drops $50M on Hortonworks
3.   Yammer Moved to Office 365
4.   Will Next OS X Bring New Apple Grief?
5.   Sprint Becomes Google Apps Reseller


advertisement
Salesforce App Personalizes the Sale
New CRM and sales automation tools.
Average Rating:
Mac OS Yosemite Beta 4 Released
Public preview could be coming soon.
Average Rating:
Cisco Woos More Devs with DevNet
To create new network-aware apps.
Average Rating:
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
Researchers Working To Fix Tor Security Exploit
Developers for the Tor privacy browser are scrambling to fix a bug revealed Monday that researchers say could allow hackers, or government surveillance agencies, to track users online.
 
Wall Street Journal Hacked Again
Hacked again. That’s the story at the Wall Street Journal this week as the newspaper reports that the computer systems housing some of its news graphics were breached. Customers not affected -- yet.
 
Dropbox for Business Beefs Up Security
Dropbox is upping its game for business users. The cloud-based storage and sharing company has rolled out new security, search and other features to boost its appeal for businesses.
 

Enterprise Hardware Spotlight
Apple Updates MacBook Pros, Cuts Prices Up to $100
The popular MacBook Pro laptop line just got an update and a price cut of as much as $100. The MacBook Pro with Retina display now includes faster processors and double the memory.
 
Watson Gets His First Customer Service Gig
Since appearing on Jeopardy, IBM's Watson supercomputer has been making a living using his super-intelligent knowledge base for business verticals. Now, Watson's been hired for his first customer service job.
 
Tablet Giants Apple and Samsung Feel the Heat
When a company saturates its home market with a once-hot product, expect it to pump up efforts elsewhere. Apple, for its part, is now pushing iPads to big corporations and the enterprise market.
 

Mobile Technology Spotlight
Android 'Fake ID' Puts Millions of Users at Risk
Having this fake ID is nothing to brag about, even if you are a minor. The “Fake ID” Android flaw drops malware into smartphone apps. It can steal credit card data and even take over your device.
 
FTC Wants Fix for 'Perfect Scam' of Mobile Cramming
The U.S. Federal Trade Commission has issued new guidelines to curb “mobile cramming,” a troublesome practice that adds unauthorized third-party charges to mobile phone bills.
 
Facebook: You Will Use Messenger, and You Will Like It
Starting this week, Facebook users with Android and iOS phones will be forced to use the separate Messenger app to send Facebook messages. Pending messages will still be visible in the main app.
 

Navigation
Enterprise Security Today
Home/Top News | Network Security | Viruses & Malware | Cybercrime | Security Solutions | Mobile Security | Disaster Recovery | Windows Security
Data Security | EST Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.