Newsletters
The Enterprise Security Supersite NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
This ad will display for the next 20 seconds. Please click for more information, or scroll down to pass the ad, or Close Ad.
Home Network Security Viruses & Malware Hackers Security Solutions More Topics...
Vblock™ Systems:
Advanced converged infrastructure
increases productivity & lowers costs.

www.vce.com
Viruses & Malware
24/7/365 Network Uptime
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
Costly Citadel Banking Trojan Dealt a Blow
Costly Citadel Banking Trojan Dealt a Blow

By Jennifer LeClaire
June 6, 2013 12:17PM

Bookmark and Share
Symantec reports that Citadel infections have spread around the globe, but in the past six months the majority of infections have been in Australia, Italy and the U.S. While these take-downs may not eliminate the threat of Citadel completely, Symantec's Orla Cox said it certainly disrupts current campaigns and sends a clear message to attackers that their actions are being monitored.
 


Microsoft is putting its hero hat on this week. Redmond worked with members of the financial services industry and the FBI to scramble operations of a banking Trojan-horse program widely known as Citadel. The online sting saw more than 1,000 Citadel botnets taken offline.

According to Symantec, Citadel is a banking Trojan that has been doing its makers' dirty work since 2011. Like most banking Trojans, the security firm said, Citadel is a full crimeware kit. It provides the attackers with payload builders, a command and control (C&C) server infrastructure, and configuration scripts to target various banks. Citadel is a descendant of that other behemoth of the financial Trojan world, Trojan.Zbot (Zeus).

"Citadel is aimed at a more 'exclusive' attacker market than its more widespread predecessor, Zeus," Symantec's Orla Cox wrote in a blog post. "The Citadel kit is sold through underground Russian forums and typically costs around $3,000, compared to $100 for the SpyEye and leaked Zeus kits. Citadel users will also have to fork out a further $30-$100 to purchase Web inject code for the banks that they wish to target. Additionally, even if attackers have that money to spend, there is a strict vetting process with referrals required for new purchasers."

Weight of the Law

Symantec reports that Citadel infections have spread around the globe, but in the past six months the majority of infections have been in Australia, Italy and the U.S. While these take-downs may not eliminate the threat of Citadel completely, Cox said it certainly disrupts current campaigns and sends out a clear message to attackers that their actions are being monitored.

We caught up with Richard Westmoreland, a security analyst at SilverSky, to get his take on the take-downs. He told us out of all the bots, Zeus still remains infamous.

"Microsoft should be applauded for tackling the problem head-on, with appropriate credit also given to Agari [an e-mail security firm]. By taking legal action to disable resources used in botnets, it turns a virtual problem that is easy to ignore into a real problem that forces networking vendors to act," Westmoreland said.

"With enough momentum, these type of take-downs may fill a gap where regulatory compliance may not be applicable. Take-downs are disruptive and embarrassing to legitimate businesses and are best avoided via additional controls and security monitoring."

Weight of Corporations

We also asked Ken Pickering, development manager, security intelligence at CORE Security, for his thoughts. He told us it's encouraging to see security firms taking an active stance against large criminal botnets.

"These botnets are responsible for millions -- if not billions -- in fraud, and they infect millions of PCs worldwide. Realistically, if firms like Microsoft, Symantec and Kaspersky don't tackle this problem, who will?" he asked. "Traditional law enforcement boundaries and skill sets don't usually carry over well onto the Internet, so decisive actions from these large companies are essential if we're ever going to stop this plague."
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:



APC has an established a reputation for solid products that virtually pay for themselves upon installation. Who has time to spend worrying about system downtime? APC makes it easy for you to focus on business growth instead of business downtime with reliable data center systems and IT solutions. Learn more here.


 Viruses & Malware
1.   Lessons from Verizon's Threat Report
2.   Malware Targets Facebook Users
3.   OpenSSL Calls for More Support
4.   How, Why Heartbleed Got Its Name
5.   Android Apps Mine Virtual Currency


advertisement
Lessons from Verizon's Threat Report
Enterprises can learn a thing or two.
Average Rating:
Malware Targets Facebook Users
iBanking app spys on communications.
Average Rating:
Android Apps Mine Virtual Currency
Malware drains mobile phone battery.
Average Rating:
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
Tech Giants Fund Initiative To Prevent Future Heartbleeds
Can more funding prevent Heartbleed vulnerabilities in future open-source software? A new Core Infrastructure Initiative at the Linux Foundation is attempting to find out.
 
What Verizon's Data Breach Report Can Teach Enterprises
It’s probably not a jaw-dropper, but cyberespionage is officially on the rise. And the use of stolen or misused credentials is still the leading way the bad guys gain access to corporate information.
 
Top Cyberthreats Exposed by Verizon Report
Beyond Heartbleed, there are cyberthreats vying to take down enterprise networks, corrupt smartphones, and wreak havoc on businesses. Verizon is exposing these threats in a new report.
 

Navigation
Enterprise Security Today
Home/Top News | Network Security | Viruses & Malware | Hackers | Security Solutions | Mobile Security | Disaster Recovery | Windows Security
Data Security | EST Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters | XML/RSS Feed

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.